Getting started

Fish'n'kids

Learn to fish

What's a fish
Getting started
Fishing gear
Knots
Rigs
Baits
Fishing safety
Casting
Cleaning fish

 
 
 

handline
For both freshwater and saltwater, you can use a handline. This is a spool with a fishing line. Thinner lines catch more fish because they're harder to see. You can get it from any tackle shop. They're so cheap you could even buy one with your pocket money.

Caution: Always keep the line on the reel and never wrap the line around your hand or fingers.

rods and reels
You can use a rod and reel for freshwater and saltwater fishing. If you're starting out, try a simple combo rod and reel, consisting of a 1.5m to 1.8m rod, open face reel and a line to suit the kind of fish you're fishing for. For example, for bream and large flathead use a line of 6kg or less. For mullet, yellowtail and whiting use a line of 4kg or less.

hooks and sinkers
Start out with a 1/0 to 2/0 hook, a 2 ball sinker and a swivel to stop the line from tangling.

rules
There are rules about what kind of fishing gear you can use and where you can use it. Read more about fishing gear rules by clicking on the underlined words. Click on the back button to come back to this page.

 
 

Try one of these knots to keep your hook on the line. You can use them for saltwater and freshwater fishing. If they're too tricky, ask an adult to help.

Clinch or Blood Knot


Geoff Wilson's Complete Book of Fishing Knots and Rigs

Palomar Knot


Geoff Wilson's Complete Book of Fishing Knots and Rigs

Caution: Be careful not to hook yourself. Practise the knots without the hook at first. Ask an adult to flatten the barb on the hook.

 
 
 
 

Try this simple running sinker rig where the sinker runs all the way down to the hook for saltwater fishing.


Geoff Wilson's Complete Book of Fishing Knots and Rigs

Use a simple rig with fly for freshwater fishing.

 
 

There's lots of baits you can use. Try garden worms for starters. These are great for freshwater fishing. Bluey says beach worms are good for saltwater, too. You can put just one worm on the hook or a few on at a time.

Caution: Be careful not to hook yourself. Ask an adult to flatten the barb on the hook before putting on the bait.


Geoff Wilson's Complete Book of Fishing Knots and Rigs

In freshwater, you can also try a yabby.


Geoff Wilson's Complete Book of Fishing Knots and Rigs


baits for freshwater fish
Silver perch, golden perch and Murray cod love worms and yabbies. They also like freshwater shrimp. We also find lures irresistible. Catfish like their shrimps peeled and Murray cod also love juicy witchety grubs.

baits for saltwater fish
Try most baits for bream, a light line and the smallest possible sinker. A tailor prefers fish flesh and goes for metal lures, but make sure you've got a big hook and a strong line. A trevally loves prawns and fish bait.

A leatherjacket goes after bits of peeled prawn on a small hook. Use a fair sized sinker.

Attract a flathead with live small mullet or a strip of fish flesh on a big hook at the end of a strong line.

 
 
 

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